ISLPR Language Services Blog

Guidelines for ISLPR Tests: Listening Test

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 31, 2018 at 1:30 PM

Speaking, Listening and Reading skills are tested in a one-to-one interview that takes about 60 minutes. The interview is audio-recorded. Three things determined the content of the test: everyday life in Australia, everyday. 

 

listen

Academic Test:

Listening skills are judged throughout the interview. In one part of the interview, however, recordings will also be used.

The tester will ask you to listen to one or more authentic texts e.g.:

  • news stories
  • news commentaries
  • interviews
  • talkback
  • documentary material
  • community announcements
  • advertisements
  • messages on answering machines

The voices will be mainly those of speakers of standard Australian English but there may be segments with other varieties of English. Generally you will hear each text only once; occasionally a short segment may be repeated so that the tester can check your understanding of particular details. With longer texts, you may like to take notes while you are listening to the recordings. If you do take notes, you are advised to keep them short. After you have listened to a text, you will show how well you have understood it by talking to the tester about it. While you are talking, you may refer to any notes you have taken but you must give them to the tester when this part of the test is finished.

Listen to the radio

Professional Registration:

Listening skills are judged throughout the interview. In one part of the interview, however, audio or video recordings will also be used.

You will listen to authentic texts related to education and the socialisation of young people. After you have listened to a text, you will demonstrate your comprehension by talking to the tester about it.

You may choose to take notes as an aid to memory. The tester may check your comprehension of a section of a text and then resume playing the tape. Generally any text is heard only once; occasionally a short segment may be repeated so that the tester can check your comprehension of certain key details.

The texts may be:

  • news stories
  • news commentaries
  • interviews
  • talk-back
  • documentary material
  • community announcements or,
  • advertisements.
The voices will be mainly those of speakers of standard Australian English but there may be segments with other varieties of English. The tester is also likely to ask you to listen to children speaking.

Vocational Test:

Listening skills are judged throughout the interview. In one part of the interview, however, recordings will also be used. You will listen to authentic texts that will include one or more texts related to your vocation; other texts may be of a general nature.

After you have listened to a text, you will demonstrate your comprehension by talking to the tester about it. With longer texts, you may choose to take notes as an aid to memory.The tester may check your comprehension of a section of a text and then resume playing the recording.

Generally any text is heard only once; occasionally a short segment may be repeated so that the tester can check your comprehension of particular key details.

The texts may be:

  • news stories
  • news commentaries
  • interviews
  • talk-back
  • documentary material
  • community announcements
  • advertisements.
The voices will be mainly those of speakers of standard Australian English but there may be segments with other varieties of English.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Australia, Teacher registration, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Listening Test

Guidelines for ISLPR Tests: Reading Test

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 27, 2018 at 6:07 PM

Speaking, Listening and Reading skills are tested in a one-to-one interview that takes about 60 minutes. The interview is audio-recorded. Three things determined the content of the test: everyday life in Australia, everyday. 

 practise reading skills at home

Academic Test:

In one part of the interview, the tester will ask you to read a variety of texts. Texts may be selected from such materials as;

  • news stories
  • feature stories
  • editorials
  • 'letter to the editor'
  • columnists' opinions
  • advertisements or,
  • community information (e.g. brochures).
There may be some semi-technical material (e.g. from a textbook or special interest magazine). The time allowed for reading will depend on the length of the text and the kind of information in the text. You may take note, underline or use a highlighter. You will show how well you understand what you have ready by talking to the tester. You may refer to the text when you are talking to the tester. You will not be allowed to use a dictionary.

Professional Registration:

In one part of the interview, you will read a variety of texts related to education and the socialisation of young people. You will demonstrate your understanding of a text by talking to the tester about it.

Texts may be selected from such materials as the following:

  • curriculum materials (e.g. syllabuses or text-books)
  • research reports
  • material from the mass media or professional journals (e.g. news stories, feature stories, editorials, ‘letters to the editor’, columnists’ opinions, articles, reviews)
  • community information (e.g. brochures)
  • advertisements, or
  • material related to conditions of employment (e.g. newsletters from an employer or union).

The time allowed for the reading will depend on the type and length of the text, with some flexibility to account for individual differences in reading speed. You may make notes, underline, or use a highlighter as you read. You may refer back to the text while you talk to the tester. Dictionary use is not allowed.

You will also be asked to read aloud a short text. This is likely to be a notice for students, or a section of one of the reading texts


Vocational Test:

In one part of the interview, you will read a variety of texts. You will demonstrate your understanding of a text by talking to the tester about it. Texts may be selected from such materials as the following:

  • vocational training materials (e.g. text-books)
  • research reports
  • material from the mass media or professional journals (e.g. news stories, feature stories, editorials, ‘letters to the editor’, columnists’ opinions, articles, reviews)
  • community information (e.g. brochures)
  • advertisements
  • material related to conditions of employment (e.g. newsletters from an employer or union).

The time allowed for the reading will depend on the type and length of the text, with flexibility to account for individual differences in speed. You may take notes as you read. You may refer back to the text while you talk to the tester. Dictionary use is not allowed.

In some vocations, you may also be asked to read aloud a short text typical of material read aloud in your vocation.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Australia, Teacher registration, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Reading test, Reading skills

Guidelines for ISLPR Tests: Speaking Test

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 27, 2018 at 5:30 PM

Speaking, Listening and Reading skills are tested in a one-to-one interview that takes about 60 minutes. The interview is audio-recorded. Three things determined the content of the test: everyday life in Australia, everyday. 

 Practise your speaking skills with friends

Academic Test:

Speaking Skills are judged throughout the interview. The first part of the interview (about 15 minutes) is a conversation. The tester will introduce topics about everyday life and your particular needs and interests.

Professional Registration:

Speaking skills are judged throughout the interview. The first part of the interview (about 15 minutes) is a conversation including education-related topics. The tester is likely to ask you to talk about some aspect of your personal experience and to discuss issues related to education and the socialisation of young people.


Vocational Test:

Speaking skills are judged throughout the interview. The first part of the interview (about 15 minutes) is a conversation including vocation-related topics. The tester is likely to ask you to talk about some aspect of your personal experience and to discuss issues related to your vocation.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Australia, Teacher registration, Speaking Test, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools

Strategies for ISLPR Test Candidates: The Writing Test (Part 2)

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 19, 2018 at 6:02 PM

Over the next month we will go over some tips to help you mentally prepare yourself for an ISLPR test and strategies to help you perform well during an exam.

To make things easy, we'll break the test down into 4 parts and provide strategies to improve each of your macro-skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Today, we're looking at:

 

The Writing Test.

 ISLPR writing test

 

Part 2: during the test

  1. The task sheet indicates the audience (who you are writing for) and why you are writing, as well as the topic and the text type (e.g. report, 'letter to the editor'). All these things are important, so check with the tester if you are not sure.
  2. Where appropriate, try to imagine yourself in the situation outlined on the task sheet.
  3. Use the white space on the task sheet to make notes to plan your work but not to write a full draft that you hope to copy into the writing booklet.
  4. When planning, be realistic about what you can express in English.
  5. When you refer to ideas from the task sheet, change the wording if possible but don't think that you must use synonyms to avoid repeating your own words.
  6. Don't be afraid to use short, simple sentences in either the shorter or longer task.
  7. The number of paragraphs that you use in either the shorter or longer task should depend on the way that you group your sentences into main points. There is nothing magic about five paragraphs.
  8. Don't be afraid to use very short paragraphs in either the shorter or longer task.
  9. Not all paragraphs start with a topic sentence, even in academic writing.
  10. Use linkers such as "moreover" when necessary but only when necessary.
  11. Avoid cliches such as "every coin has two sides".
  12. To delete a piece of text, consider simply putting a line through it rather than using liquid paper or an eraser.
  13. When checking, try reading to yourself what you have written so that you 'hear' in your head if it sounds right. 

Now, a final two general points to remember before your test!

  1. Avoid 'emotional blackmail'  (e.g. telling the tester how important it is for you to 'pass' the test).
  2. Don't ask the teacher how well you have done. You will receive your results when they're ready.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, University students, English test, individual tests, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Writing Test

Strategies for ISLPR Test Candidates: The Writing Test (Part 1)

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 18, 2018 at 9:37 PM

Over the next month we will go over some tips to help you mentally prepare yourself for an ISLPR test and strategies to help you perform well during an exam.

To make things easy, we'll break the test down into 4 parts and provide strategies to improve each of your macro-skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Today, we're looking at:

The Writing Test.

 

Practice your writing skills at home.

 

Part 1: before the test

Practise writing in English every day. Write texts as outlined in the Guidelines blog so that you know what they look like in your handwriting and you don't waste time counting words during the test. Practise writing about 400 words in 60 minutes, including time for planning and for checking and editing.

Do not try guess what your tasks will be and practise only these. Also do not prepare 'chunks' of language - other than very short formulae such as greetings - that you hope you can use for almost any topic.

When you write with a word-processor, use the spell-check and grammar-check functions constructively (e.g. to keep track of the mistakes that you make and to help you reflect on why you make them).

Check with your teacher or a modern textbook for basic formatting conventions (e.g. indicating new paragraphs) and for editing conventions (e.g. for inserting a piece of text) in hand-written texts.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Teacher registration, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Listening Test

At ILS, language testing is personal.

Language is an interactive and social skill. Therefore, we believe English should be taught and tested similarly.

ISLPR Language Services (ILS) developed the ISLPR® Test because we saw the need for a test that examined your real-life language. The ISLPR® Test is an interactive and personalised test. As the ISLPR test is personalised for each candidate, there are no tricks to pass the test. 

Why we're different:

  • We test your speaking, listening and reading skills in a one-to-one interview.
  • The content of your test is customised to match your area of expertise.
  • The ISLPR is the shortest English test, therefore minimising the chance of fatigue.
  • We offer individual English tutorials with accredited tutors.
  • We offer a feedback service so you can find out why you got that rating in your test.

 

Tell me more about the ISLPR Test

 

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