ISLPR Language Services Blog

Strategies for ISLPR Test Candidates: The Writing Test (Part 1)

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 18, 2018 at 9:37 PM

Over the next month we will go over some tips to help you mentally prepare yourself for an ISLPR test and strategies to help you perform well during an exam.

To make things easy, we'll break the test down into 4 parts and provide strategies to improve each of your macro-skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Today, we're looking at:

The Writing Test.

 

Practice your writing skills at home.

 

Part 1: before the test

Practise writing in English every day. Write texts as outlined in the Guidelines blog so that you know what they look like in your handwriting and you don't waste time counting words during the test. Practise writing about 400 words in 60 minutes, including time for planning and for checking and editing.

Do not try guess what your tasks will be and practise only these. Also do not prepare 'chunks' of language - other than very short formulae such as greetings - that you hope you can use for almost any topic.

When you write with a word-processor, use the spell-check and grammar-check functions constructively (e.g. to keep track of the mistakes that you make and to help you reflect on why you make them).

Check with your teacher or a modern textbook for basic formatting conventions (e.g. indicating new paragraphs) and for editing conventions (e.g. for inserting a piece of text) in hand-written texts.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Teacher registration, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Listening Test

Guidelines for ISLPR Tests: Writing Test

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 18, 2018 at 9:36 PM

Academic Test:

In the Writing test you will be asked to write about 400 words in total.

  • There are usually two tasks; occasionally three tasks are given but the total number of words expected will remain the same.
  • The topic, the type of text, the purpose for writing and the audience to whom you are writing will be different for each task.
  • One of the tasks is likely to be a letter or a note. In another task, you will be expected to express your opinion(s).
  • If your test is for entry to a tertiary program, at least one topic will be relevant to the academic discipline or profession you plan to enter (e.g. business or engineering); it is likely to be a report, a personal statement, an essay, an article, or an open letter (e.g. a ‘letter to the editor’)
  • If your test is for entry to a High School program, the topic will be an issue of interest to adolescents; it may be an essay, an article for a school newsletter or magazine, or a project report. You will not be allowed to use a dictionary.

Professional Registration:

You will write two texts, totalling about 400 words, in 60 minutes.

  • At least one of the texts will be directly related to teaching practice.
  • The audience is likely to be students, parents, colleagues or other members of the school community, or officers in the education system.
  • The other task will be a memo, report, article, submission or open letter (e.g. a ‘letter to the editor’ of a newspaper) in which you might be expected to express opinions about education.
  • Dictionary use is not allowed.
  • Generally tasks will relate to the sorts of tasks teachers could be expected to undertake.

Vocational Test:

You will write two texts, totalling about 400 words, in 60 minutes.

  • At least one of the texts will be directly related to your vocational practice.
  • The audience could include members of the general public, an employer, a supervisor, a union or government official, or someone else you might communicate with in your vocational role(s).
  • The other task will be a memo, report, article, submission or open letter (e.g. a ‘letter to the editor’ of a newspaper) in which you might be expected to express opinions or ideas relevant to your vocation.
  • Dictionary use is not allowed.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Australia, Teacher registration, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Writing Test

What is the difference between an Academic, Professional and Vocational test?

Posted by Kenina Ingram on July 18, 2018 at 8:25 PM

The form and content of the test all ISLPR Tests

Speaking, Listening and Reading skills are tested in a one-to-one interview that takes about 60 minutes. The interview is audio-recorded. For the Writing test, the tester will give you task sheets and explain the tasks to you; then you will have 60 minutes to write.

Academic Test:University

The academic test is for candidates wishing to take a test in order to gain entry into an academic program (e.g. university or other educational institutions).

Three things determine the content of the test: everyday life in Australia, everyday life in the university or other educational institution, and your academic discipline.

Professional Registration Test: teacher

We have developed an approach to testing that focuses on the English language used by teachers in their roles as practitioners and professionals in Australian society. The focus is especially on your practical ability in using English. 

Three things determine the content of the test: everyday life in Australia, everyday life in an Australian school, and your field in education.

Vocational Test:Working Professionals

The vocational test is designed for candidates wishing to take a test for vocational purposes other than teaching. The focus is especially on your practical ability in using English.

Three things determine the content of the test: everyday life in Australia, life in your vocational workplace, and your vocational field.  

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Australia, Teacher registration, preparation

Strategies for ISLPR Test Candidates: The Listening Test (Part 1)

Posted by Kenina Ingram on June 26, 2018 at 3:57 PM

Over the next month we will go over some tips to help you mentally prepare yourself for an ISLPR test and strategies to help you perform well during an exam.

To make things easy, we'll break the test down into 4 parts and provide strategies to improve each of your macro-skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Today, we're looking at:

The Listening Test.

 

Listening

 

Part 1: before the test

Talk with a wide range of native speakers of English in your local community, not just teachers, and listen to public announcements (e.g. in shopping centres and trains) and other electronic messages.

Listen to the Australian radio. Use the ABC website to find programs that are of interest to you (especially where the topic is related to what you want to study or your professional field).

Find out when they will be broadcast in case you can listen to them 'live' and also if they can be accessed through your computer, smartphone or tablet. Some TV programs (e.g. news, documentaries and Australian drama) are also useful.

You may also like to practise taking notes with texts of different types and different lengths.

Topics: Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Teacher registration, Macro skills, preparation, tips, tools, Listening Test

"Do I need to prepare for an ISLPR test?"

Posted by Kenina Ingram on June 8, 2018 at 3:45 PM

We get asked this question a lot at ISLPR Language Services (ILS). The short answer is, no. You do not need to prepare for an ISLPR test the way you might prepare for other English tests.

books

For example, with the ISLPR writing test we do not recommend that you try to guess what your tasks will be and spend a lot of time practising these and only these. We also do not recommend that you practise complicated phrases that you hope you can use for any topic.

Every ISLPR test is personalised to suit your interests and needs. Therefore, we recommend you practise the language that is relevant to your profession. If you are doing the test for teacher's registration, focus on material that is relevant to your profession as a teacher.

Lastly, the ISLPR test focuses on real life language. Practise your English at home and use it daily. Try to engage in conversation with a wide range of proficient speakers of English in your local community. We have free activity sheets available to download on our website to help you practise your English at home. Subscribe to our blog where we post strategies to improve your English and information to help you perform well during an ISLPR test. If you require further help, book a personalised English tutorial with our team at ILS.

We are here to ensure your English skills are the best they can be BEFORE you sit your exam!

 

Did you know? The application packs we have available for download when applying for an academic, professional or vocational test have a 'Guidelines' page. This page has information about the kinds of tasks you can expect in your test and what the testers are looking for when they are assessing your English skills.

 

Please note: due to the nature of the ISLPR test, sample tests are not available.

 

Topics: Insider, Learn english, ISLPR, Language test, Personalised testing, customised testing, English as a second language, Teachers, University students, English test, individual tests, Australia, Teacher registration, preparation, tips, tools

At ILS, language testing is personal.

Language is an interactive and social skill. Therefore, we believe English should be taught and tested similarly.

ISLPR Language Services (ILS) developed the ISLPR® Test because we saw the need for a test that examined your real-life language. The ISLPR® Test is an interactive and personalised test. As the ISLPR test is personalised for each candidate, there are no tricks to pass the test. 

Why we're different:

  • We test your speaking, listening and reading skills in a one-to-one interview.
  • The content of your test is customised to match your area of expertise.
  • The ISLPR is the shortest English test, therefore minimising the chance of fatigue.
  • We offer individual English tutorials with accredited tutors.
  • We offer a feedback service so you can find out why you got that rating in your test.

 

Tell me more about the ISLPR Test

 

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